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People are using Facebook and Instagram as search engines. During a pandemic, that’s dangerous.
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Articles by Laura Hazard Owen

Laura Hazard Owen is deputy editor of the Lab. She was previously the managing editor of Gigaom, where she also wrote about digital book publishing. She first became interested in paywalls and other Labby issues as a staff writer at paidContent.
@laurahazardowen
What Noted is not is a separate, cheaper Wall Street Journal gateway product (we remember you, NYT Now).
Plus: A look at COVID-19 misinformation in Black online communities, and how conservative media may have made the pandemic worse.
Plus: A new public health program is looking for a “silent majority” to debunk vaccine misinformation on social media.
In the United States, more than a third of those who pay for online news have signed up for two or more subscriptions.
“My boss — sitting next to me in a meeting with his boss — stretched out his leg to lower the chair I was sitting in while I was speaking. A seat at the table is not enough.”
On June 10, the most popular stories across Facebook were all NASCAR banning Confederate flags and Blue Lives Matter (with a sprinkling of dead kids). Over in Facebook News, though, things were different.
“People who are stars get away with murder.”
“It has never been my expectation that every piece the New York Times publishes will confirm my personal worldview, but it was also never my expectation The Times would run an op-ed calling for state violence.”
“Although in some incidents it is possible the journalists were hit or affected accidentally, in the majority of the cases we have recorded the journalists are clearly identifiable as press, and it is clear that they are being deliberately targeted.”