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Real News About Fake News

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Plus: “Like the experts predicted back in 2016, we did end up heading down the dystopian path.”
Plus: Cognizant is exiting the content moderation business, and fake news–debunking Lithuanian “elves.”
“Persistent debates about what constitutes ‘fake news’ and distinctions between other types of false information are mostly distracting.” Plus: A guide to covering misinformation without burning your news org or your readers, and a discussion of filter bubbles as not-really-a-thing.
Plus: All those researchers who were supposed to get Facebook disinformation data will have to wait a bit longer.
Plus: “Newsworthiness” and how politicians are fact-checked on Facebook, and the number of countries with political disinformation campaigns has more than doubled in the past two years.
Plus, a new free course for online fact-checking taught via workspace app Notion.
Plus, which Facebook pages get the largest percentage of “angry” reactions.
Plus: Alex Stamos and Renee DiResta are launching an “observatory” for internet abuse at Stanford, and misconceptions about disinformation.
Plus: How college students evaluate fake vs. real news, and an algorithm that doesn’t just identify fake news but explains why.
Plus: A fake news game that seems to inoculate players against fake news.
“In the U.S., though there are some outlets with populist audiences — such as Fox and HuffPost — it is clear that the majority of outlets have audiences that are predominately non-populist left, such as The New York Times.”
Plus: A new raft of misinformation research to read, and the actual dollar cost of anti-vaxxing.
“More than a quarter of the content shared by the Bharatiya Janata Party and a fifth of the content shared by the Indian National Congress is junk news.”
Plus: Whether Americans believe climate change is caused by humans depends on how you ask the question, and WhatsApp clones are getting around some restrictions designed to limit the spread of fake news.