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What makes people avoid the news? Trust, age, political leanings — but also whether their country’s press is free
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Real News About Fake News

The growing stream of reporting on and data about fake news, misinformation, partisan content, and news literacy is hard to keep up with. This weekly roundup offers the highlights of what you might have missed.

Plus: How a fake news headline came to be (there are no “Obama-Soros Antifa Supersoldiers”) and trends in Covid-19 misinformation.
Plus: Misinformation around Black Lives Matter protests and an analysis of the most-shared COVID-19 misinformation in Europe.
Plus: A new public health program is looking for a “silent majority” to debunk vaccine misinformation on social media.
Plus: Conspiracy theories on TikTok, and “over one-quarter of the most viewed YouTube videos on COVID-19 contained misleading information.”
“Populist Twitter decries any misstep by authority as confirmation of wholesale ineptitude or corruption — as if a mistake anywhere casts doubt on expertise everywhere.” Plus: Facebook announces its oversight board, and tracking traffic back to WhatsApp.
Plus: Facebook allows “rampant climate denialism” around the Australian wildfires, and female politicians in India face a disproportionate amount of trolling.
Plus: Emphasizing a publisher’s name on social doesn’t seem to impact readers’ misinfo radar much one way or the other.
Plus: YouTube would radicalize even without its algorithm, Reddit bans fakes both deep and cheap, and Facebook will let you dial down political ads.
Plus: “There is no bygone era of a well-informed, attentive public. What we have had in lieu of a well-informed citizenry is what might be termed a ‘load-bearing’ myth — the myth of the attentive public.”
Plus: “Subtly inducing people to think about the concept of accuracy decreases their sharing of false and misleading news relative to accurate news,” and the scariest deepfakes of all.
Plus: Hello “lifestyle misinformation,” hundreds of dead newspapers “revived” online to support Indian interests, and all of the fact-checking discussion you could possibly want.
Plus: “Like the experts predicted back in 2016, we did end up heading down the dystopian path.”
Plus: Cognizant is exiting the content moderation business, and fake news–debunking Lithuanian “elves.”
“Persistent debates about what constitutes ‘fake news’ and distinctions between other types of false information are mostly distracting.” Plus: A guide to covering misinformation without burning your news org or your readers, and a discussion of filter bubbles as not-really-a-thing.
Plus: All those researchers who were supposed to get Facebook disinformation data will have to wait a bit longer.