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After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
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After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
“We will all have to adjust to a new workflow. If it is a bottleneck, it will be a failure.”
By Sarah Scire
“Impossible to approach the reporting the way I normally would”: How Rachel Aviv wrote that New Yorker story on Lucy Letby
“So much of the media coverage — and the trial itself — started at the point at which we’ve determined that [Lucy] Letby is an evil murderer; all her texts, notes, and movements are then viewed through that lens.”
By Sarah Scire
Increasingly stress-inducing subject lines helped The Intercept surpass its fundraising goal
“We feel like we really owe it to our readers to be honest about the stakes and to let them know that we truly cannot do this work without them.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
In an increasingly fractured Europe, this project is betting on one-on-one talks as a way to find common ground
“We get requests from all over the world, and everyone says that their country is experiencing unprecedented levels of polarization or a breakdown in social cohesion.”
By Eduardo Suárez
After The Messenger’s collapse, Jimmy Finkelstein seems to be itching for a do-over
“May I suggest to any potential investors just setting your money on fire instead? Faster, less traumatic, same outcome.”
By Joshua Benton
Apple News adds a new original game to boost News+ subscriptions
The news aggregator app has focused on puzzles and games that are “more welcoming to newcomers.”
By Sarah Scire
People who got off Facebook for 6 pivotal weeks in 2020 may have been less likely to vote for Trump
“We do think our results can inform readers’ priors about the potential effects of social media in the final weeks of high-profile national elections.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
How NPR and Floodlight teamed up to uncover fossil fuel “news mirages” across the country
“It’s information. But it’s not news.”
By Neel Dhanesha
This journalism professor made a NYC chatbot in minutes. It actually worked.
“The step that we need to make as a society is moving from, ‘This came from a machine, it must be correct,’ to, if I’m talking to a friend of mine who says something crazy, ‘I need to double check that, I need to cross reference it to make sure that it is accurate.'”
By Colin Lecher, The Markup
For the first time, two Pulitzer winners disclosed using AI in their reporting
Awarded investigative stories are increasingly relying on machine learning, whether covering Chicago police negligence or Israeli weapons in Gaza
By Andrew Deck
“We’re there to cover what’s happening”: How student journalists are covering campus protests
“We don’t come in when there’s something crazy happening and then leave when it’s over. This is just what we do all the time. And I really hope that makes people trust us more as a newspaper.”
By Sophie Culpepper
Screenshots are one big winner of Meta’s news ban in Canada
“We observe a dramatic increase in posts containing screenshots of Canadian news stories in the post-ban period.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
This year’s Pulitzer Prizes were a coming-out party for online media — and a marker of local newspapers’ decline
For the first time ever, more online news sites produced Pulitzer finalists than newspapers did.
By Joshua Benton
Most Americans say local news is important. But they’re consuming less of it.
Just 15% of Americans paid or gave money to a local news source in the past year, according to new research from the Pew-Knight Initiative.
By Sophie Culpepper
After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
“We will all have to adjust to a new workflow. If it is a bottleneck, it will be a failure.”
By Sarah Scire
“Impossible to approach the reporting the way I normally would”: How Rachel Aviv wrote that New Yorker story on Lucy Letby
“So much of the media coverage — and the trial itself — started at the point at which we’ve determined that [Lucy] Letby is an evil murderer; all her texts, notes, and movements are then viewed through that lens.”
Increasingly stress-inducing subject lines helped The Intercept surpass its fundraising goal
“We feel like we really owe it to our readers to be honest about the stakes and to let them know that we truly cannot do this work without them.”
What We’re Reading
WIRED / Nilesh Christopher and Varsha Bansal
Indian voters are being bombarded with millions of deepfakes. Political candidates approve
“While the U.S. recently made it illegal to use AI-generated voices for unsolicited calls, in India sanctioned deepfakes have become a $60 million business opportunity. More than 50 million AI-generated voice clone calls were made in the two months leading up to the start of the elections in April—and millions more will be made during voting.”
Semafor / Max Tani
As clicks dry up for news sites, could Apple’s news app be a lifeline?
“The partnership also raises some of the questions publishers avoided during the peak social media era. It incentivizes users to subscribe to Apple News+ rather than to publications directly, likely cannibalizing some potential revenue. It’s driving editorial decisions, meaning publishers are once again changing their content strategy to placate a platform. And of course the company could wake up one day and decide, like Facebook, that it no longer really wants to be in the news business, leaving news publishers stranded.”
The New York Times / Benjamin Mullin and Katie Robertson
Fraud trial to begin for Ozy founder Carlos Watson
“The jury trial of Carlos Watson, who is charged with trying to defraud investors in the digital media start-up he co-founded, Ozy Media, is scheduled to begin Monday with jury selection in federal court in Brooklyn. Mr. Watson has pleaded not guilty to all the charges against him. If convicted, he could face up to 37 years in prison.”
The Verge / Nilay Patel
Google CEO Sundar Pichai on AI-powered search and the future of the web
Alphabet and Google CEO Sundar Pichai “says injecting AI into Search is about creating value for users, and those users are telling him that they find these new features to be helpful — and even clicking on links at higher rates in the AI previews. But he didn’t say where that leaves the people who put the content on the internet in the first place.”
The Washington Post / Pranshu Verma
These ISIS news anchors are AI fakes. Their propaganda is real.
“The videos offer some of the earliest signs of AI helping terrorist groups quickly disseminate propaganda and recruit members, terrorism media experts said — and have even sparked an internal debate over the use of the technology under Islamic law.”
CNN / Lauren Kent, Jack Guy, Claudia Rebaza and Lauren Said-Moorhouse
Julian Assange can appeal extradition to the U.S., U.K. court rules
“The 52-year-old is wanted by U.S. authorities on espionage charges connected to his organization’s publication of thousands of classified documents and diplomatic cables in 2010 and 2011. Assange faces spending the rest of his life behind bars if convicted.”
Vanity Fair / Charlotte Klein
Meet “the Inspector General” of the New York Times newsroom
“Today the Times newsroom is a different place than it was 10 years ago…Management feels they have to provide more guidance across the board and take concerted moves to protect the institution. [Charlotte] Behrendt’s evolved role seems to be one such mechanism. As one former senior editor put it, ‘The fact that she has internal investigations in her title is a character change of astonishing order.'”
Chicago Tribune / Robert Channick and Vincent Alban
Tribune press operators say goodbye to an era as Freedom Center makes its final run
“‘You almost feel like an artist,’ [Andrew] Whitaker said. ‘People really don’t understand the logistics that go into the printing process. It seems like the paper just appears, but there’s a lot to it.'”
Pew Research Center / Emily Tomasik
More Americans want the journalists they get news from to share their politics than any other personal trait
“Most Americans say it is not important that the news they get comes from journalists who share their political views, age, gender or other traits. But people are more likely to say it is important for journalists to share their politics than any other characteristic we asked about.”
Axios / Tim Baysinger
Amazon wants Prime to be the ESPN of the streaming era
“Amazon is closing in on a deal to make it one of three partners with the NBA, a source with knowledge of those talks confirmed to Axios… Adding the NBA would be the latest salvo for Amazon’s quickly growing sports business.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.