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What makes people avoid the news? Trust, age, political leanings — but also whether their country’s press is free
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Articles tagged Google (459)

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A giant potential audience isn’t good enough on its own anymore: “It’s time to re-examine all of our relationships with the big platforms.”
Google and Facebook are happy to pay for news — as long as it’s on their terms.
“You want to move your business and your model to the place on the media chessboard where the dollars are going to be going” — the TV money that will follow audiences to streaming.
Facebook and Google argue that the value they derive from news content is marginal and they don’t believe they should be responsible for funding it.
A new round of consolidation could kill off half of what were the major U.S. newspaper chains just a few months ago. But the possibility of platform cash is sparking hope.
Sometimes it’s the sort of basic Internet skill you might take for granted — like knowing how to search a web page — that can stop someone from sharing fake news.
After ten years of writing for Nieman Lab, Ken takes a big look back and ahead, defining the state of affairs for the troubled world of journalism.
One-fifth of the ads on climate misinformation videos were from Greenpeace, World Wildlife Fund, or other green/environmental groups.
Republicans and Democrats are (surprisingly!) teaming up to help news organizations negotiate with the tech giants. But it’s unlikely to have a substantial impact on the dysfunctional relationship between publishers and platforms.