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Articles tagged health misinformation (6)

“We owe it to our readers and to the general public, and even to our sources, to be thoughtful in what we decide to cover, and to make sure that it’s worthy of the platform that we’re giving it.”
“Don’t be afraid to tackle misinformation head on. It’s important that people speak out, and you can repeat [misinformation] and then debunk it.”
“Some participants even developed false memories about the fake stories they had read…’Remembering’ previously hearing a fake COVID-19 story seemed to make some people in our study more likely to act in a certain way.”
A user with greater health literacy is more likely to discover usable medical advice from a reputed health care provider, such as the Mayo Clinic.
Plus: Big advertisers ban YouTube (not over vaccines), the National Cancer Institute wonders how to respond to health misinformation, and how to fill a data void.
Politics isn’t the only place where countering misinformation is tricky business: “The best evidence suggests that a more effective way of dealing with misinformation is not spreading it in the first place. That means avoiding repeating various myths — even if you’re debunking them.”