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June 3, 2009, 2:15 p.m.

Charging for news: API’s recommendations

At the Chicago meeting last week of top newspaper execs to talk about paid content, they heard from several entrepreneurs who are proposing new ways for papers to generate revenue online. Zach wrote yesterday about Steve Brill’s pitch; you’ll hear about a few more here in the coming days.

For the meeting, the American Press Institute also prepared a “Newspaper Economic Action Plan” that detailed “models and recommendations” for charging for online content. Our friend Rick Edmonds has already summed up the report and its findings well, but we got a hold of the actual report so you can see it for yourself.

Download a copy here.

You can evaluate the ideas within for yourself; I like some of them more than others. But I must give an ever-so-tiny ding to API for using again (on page 4) the old cliche that “the Chinese symbol for risk…combines the characters for danger as well as opportunity,” which is not precisely true.

POSTED     June 3, 2009, 2:15 p.m.
PART OF A SERIES     The Chicago Meeting
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