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Jan. 17, 2017, noon
Audience & Social

Here’s how Twitter is reacting to The New York Times’ 2020 report

The Times released the report on Tuesday, and Media Twitter is already dissecting its every word.

The New York Times on Tuesday released its 2020 report, outlining a vision for how its newsroom can help build a sustainable news business into the next decade. The report emphasizes the need to provide value for subscribers, introduce more visual forms of journalism, and change workflows to better suit today’s news ecosystem.

You can find our thoughts and summary of the report here, but of course, an entire second layer of reaction took place on Media Twitter.

Times columnist David Leonhardt, one of the report’s authors, tweetstormed some of the report’s main points. (These are some highlights; click on the tweets for the full thread.)

Others emphasized the paper’s focus on digital revenue — specifically subscriptions — as the key to its future.

(Note that those numbers are disputed by Timesfolk and mostly driven by the Post’s more aggregation-heavy content strategy.)

There was also comment on the paper’s internal processes — from its CMS to the type of journalism it is producing.

Another thread of discussion focused on the Times’ training processes, which the report says it plans to revamp.

Photo by sari_dennise used under a Creative Commons license.

POSTED     Jan. 17, 2017, noon
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