Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
One group that’s really benefitted from Covid-19: Anti-vaxxers
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 28, 2009, 7:15 a.m.

Morning Links: January 28, 2009

— Mark Briggs asks: What’s your video SEO strategy? (That is, how are making sure Google and other search engines are sending traffic to your videos?) He points to this study by a consulting company on the issue.

Google can’t (yet!) understand all the words spoken in your videos, so even if your subject screams “Chicken McNugget” throughout a video, no one Googling for those tasty white-meat nuggets will come across it without a little search-engine optimization help. This is one reason (among many) we publish transcripts of our videos whenever we produce a new one — Google can read transcripts just fine.

— The New York Times opens up an API for its weekly bestseller book lists. Looks interesting, but it’s a shame they don’t seem to be opening up any of the data underlying the list — that is, the sales-data secret sauce that is used to determine who’s No. 1 and who’s No. 7. That would be a fun data set to play around with.

— Bill Cunningham is the Times’ street-fashion photographer, and here is his audio slideshow from inauguration day. I link not because of the photography, but because of how blogger Jason Kottke linked to it:

Be sure to listen to Cunningham’s wonderful narration; he even gets choked up when describing the moment of Obama’s swearing-in. I wish all journalism were this professionally personal (if that makes any sense).

Emphasis all mine.

POSTED     Jan. 28, 2009, 7:15 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
One group that’s really benefitted from Covid-19: Anti-vaxxers
Plus: How a fake news headline came to be (there are no “Obama-Soros Antifa Supersoldiers”) and trends in Covid-19 misinformation.
Margaret Sullivan has written a brisk and useful guide to the horrifying decline of local news
Ghosting the News is a useful introduction to the decline of local, and Sullivan is an ideal guide.
Giving thanks isn’t just for Turkey Day: It’s also a way to retain your users
A new study of behavior on Wikipedia finds that thanking new users for their good work makes them more likely to stick around — and to thank others, too.