Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Yes, deepfakes can make people believe in misinformation — but no more than less-hyped ways of lying
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 21, 2009, 3:39 p.m.

The end of Google’s print ad effort

It’s not terribly surprising to me that Google has given up on its two-year-old program to funnel print ads to newspapers.  As a newspaper publisher, I provided pre-alpha feedback to Google on this program in 2006, and was involved in it from its earliest rollout until I left the business last spring.

No paper that I know of saw anything more than a trickle of advertising through this channel.  Google won’t say how much business Print Ads did.  But Google probably anticipated plenty of volume, so it built in only a small commission for itself.  My guestimation is that their cut came to $1 million or less — probably not enough to cover costs, and certainly a figure with not enough zeros to keep it going as part of Google.  I would not read this as Google giving up on newspapers — in better times, they killed programs with similarly minimal revenue, such as Google Answers.

Among the program’s flaws was the bidding system incorporated in it. Not only did this require a potential managerial decision for each individual ad, but it involved some back-and-forth dickering for every ad.  Most of the very few offers that came through this channel were extremely low-ball ad proposals from sometimes questionable advertisers.

Meanwhile, Google has introduced Google Ad Planner, still in beta rollout, a tool for creating online advertising plans that incorporates the ability to find and select sites based on demographics — a feature that was entirely absent from Print Ads.

POSTED     Jan. 21, 2009, 3:39 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Yes, deepfakes can make people believe in misinformation — but no more than less-hyped ways of lying
The reasons we get fooled by political lies are less about the technology behind their production and more about the mental processes that lead us to trust or mistrust, accept or discount, embrace or ignore.
Do you know the McMuffin man?
Capitol coverage, the problem with op-eds, and that Vogue cover.
Tiny News Collective aims to launch 500 new local news organizations in three years
At least half of the new newsrooms will be “based in communities that are unserved or underserved, run by founders who have historically been shut out.”