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May 13, 2009, 7:56 a.m.

Cheap, effective ads? Look to smart phones

In a down advertising market, newspapers need to be presenting their advertisers with more options for reaching consumers. For years, some have evangelized the iPhone — and other pocket-sized computers that masquerade as mere phones — as the coming platform for deep and engaging advertising.

That day would appear to finally be upon us. And, what’s better, reaching this booming growth market turns out to be not all that expensive:

IPhone advertising is also relatively cheap. [Hardee’s owner] CKE said it spent $12,000 to create its hamburger application. That’s much less than the millions of dollars it might have spent for a quality TV spot. Users can download the app free at Apple’s online App Store.

There’s more in today’s Wall Street Journal.

POSTED     May 13, 2009, 7:56 a.m.
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