Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Local news projects rush to fill The Vindicator’s void, with the McClatchy-Google network putting down roots
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 11, 2009, 11 p.m.

New York Times launches Times Wire

In what seems to be a never-ending series of experiments with different ways of displaying the news — including open APIs and the new Times Reader 2.0 AIR app — the New York Times has launched what it is calling Times Wire, a feature that displays the most recent headlines from the paper in a “river of news” style. Readers can choose either “All News” or a customized “My News” feed that lets them pick categories such as business, arts, and sports. (There’s also a dedicated Business and Technology view.)

If this seems familiar, it’s because Dave Winer — the programming guru who helped develop the original RSS syndication standard (something The New York Times was an early supporter of) — came up with something very similar years ago: a stripped-down view of the paper, similar to an RSS feed. The NYT’s newest service apparently went live at some point on Monday night — I found it thanks to a tweet from Frederic Lardinois, a writer for ReadWriteWeb — and is due to be launched officially on Tuesday.

[One other note: If the idea of a “river of news” seems familiar, you can thank Twitter — which has done more to popularize the concept of a constantly flowing stream of information, complete with “permission” to dip in or out at any time. —Josh]

POSTED     May 11, 2009, 11 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Local news projects rush to fill The Vindicator’s void, with the McClatchy-Google network putting down roots
“We’re ultimately trying to do this as small and nimble as possible so that we can be seeing what’s working and throw out what’s not — and quickly being able to shift in a way that’s a little bit harder when you’re working with a 150-year-old newspaper.”
Hey comment mods, you doin’ okay? A new study shows moderating uncivil comments reduces the moderator’s trust in news
“The toll of moderating uncivil comments may be much stronger for moderators putting in several hours or a full day.”
Attempting a meta-network for local news, Facebook announces community-building grantees
Recipients include 100 Days in Appalachia, Block Club Chicago, Chalkbeat, and the Tyler Loop, among others.