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Maybe you know that article is satire, but a lot of people can’t tell the difference
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May 26, 2010, 10 a.m.

Ellen Goodman and Jake Shapiro: Empowerment through public media

Every week, our friends at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society invite academics and other thinkers to discuss their work over lunch. Thankfully for us, they record the sessions. This week, we’re passing along some of the talks that are most relevant to the future of news.

Today’s video: Ellen Goodman and Jake Shapiro. Goodman, who specializes in information policy law at Rutgers University‘s law school, and Shapiro, the executive director of PRX, discuss public media’s role in facilitating public discourse, promoting democratic engagement, and empowering citizens to communicate and organize. Their slides and other information about the talk are available here.

POSTED     May 26, 2010, 10 a.m.
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