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The Atlantic’s layoffs may sound the death knell for two media revenue hopes: Video and in-person events
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Oct. 26, 2010, 6 p.m.

Links on Twitter: Politico’s new subscription service, National Journal on winning the morning and tips for using QR codes

One in 5 UK visitors to the Times of London site has viewed content behind the paywall http://nie.mn/96NWak »

Reading without clutter: Designing news for mobile http://nie.mn/9n633Q »

The Future of News is 3D! At least it was one night in Japan… http://nie.mn/aLJPy7 »

Congrats to winners of the Philadelphia Enterprise Reporting Awards! 14 reporting projects are about to get underway http://nie.mn/9ufZBH »

5 Ways journalists can use QR codes (Plus @webbmedia QR game at #ONA10) http://nie.mn/bAByow »

You can buy an Android tablet for $99 at Walgreens.com http://nie.mn/9ao373 (via @newsycombinator) »

Seattle Times and KING-TV creating online ad network for local blogs http://nie.mn/aCKwqL »

National Journal Editor-in-Chief Ron Fournier wants to win the morning, afternoon, overnight…http://nie.mn/dihq8e »

BoingBoing dials back on original video creation, focuses on curation http://nie.mn/a09ybt »

McKinsey to begin phasing out its premium-content paywall for McKinsey Quarterly http://nie.mn/cRSDJ4 (via @jen_mcfadden) »

Politico plans to launch a subscription-only news service http://nie.mn/aZbhgz »

 
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The Atlantic’s layoffs may sound the death knell for two media revenue hopes: Video and in-person events
“In one week in March, maybe two, the ground fell out from under live events.”
Here’s (exactly) how we organized one of the largest virtual U.S. journalism events to date
Once we announced we would host in place instead of in person, registrations shot through the roof; we ended up with just under 750 registrations by the time the conference began. Typically, the summit attracts 150 to 175 people.
Aiming for novelty in coronavirus coverage, journalists end up sensationalizing the trivial and untrue
Sometimes the biggest story does not advance as quickly as journalists might hope. It is in these moments of seeming stasis that journalistic repetition can become more powerful and serve as a way to hold government accountable.