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Sept. 14, 2011, 10 a.m.

A Nieman Lab event: Come talk with Boston Globe leaders about their new strategy Sept. 26

Globe editor Marty Baron, publisher Chris Mayer, and others discuss the new BostonGlobe.com, why they went paywall, and why they think their new approach is a winner.

The new BostonGlobe.com, which debuted Monday, sparked a lot of discussion. Will a paywall model work for a major metro newspaper? Does splitting the newspaper’s web presence in two strengthen or weaken its business model? Will young people be willing to pay for news? Will its new technological approach build a web strategy that works like an app?

If you’re interested in these sorts of questions — or in the fate of New England’s largest and most important newspaper — mark your calendar for Monday, September 26 at 5:30 p.m.. That’s when we’ll be holding an event here at the Nieman Foundation to discuss the Globe’s new strategy with the people who’ve designed and led it. You’re invited.

In attendance and on stage from the Globe will be: Chris Mayer, the newspaper’s publisher; Marty Baron, its editor; Michael Manning, product director; and Lisa DeSisto, the paper’s chief advertising officer.

I’ll be interviewing them, asking them about the new model, and then we’ll open it up for questions from the audience. Then some wine and cheese.

The event will be held at Lippmann House, our building on the edge of the Harvard campus. We’re at 1 Francis Avenue in Cambridge, which is at the corner of Kirkland Avenue, a few blocks northeast of the Harvard Square T stop.

We’d love it if you RSVPed at our Eventbrite page so we can get an idea of the number of people we can expect in attendance. Hope to see you there.

Image of Globe truck by Scott LaPierre used under a Creative Commons license.

POSTED     Sept. 14, 2011, 10 a.m.
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