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As the Christchurch massacre trial begins, New Zealand news orgs vow to keep white supremacist ideology out of their coverage
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Sept. 28, 2011, 2 p.m.

The Boston Globe’s new paywall strategy: A Nieman Journalism Lab discussion

Top Globe execs talk about the split between (free) Boston.com and (paid) BostonGlobe.com.

On Monday night, we were happy to host a discussion with some top execs at The Boston Globe on their new two-site paywall strategy. Thanks to all of you who either came to Lippmann House for the event, watched the livestream, or followed along on Twitter. We’ve now got video of the full event, which got into some meaty issues around paid content, the merits of a “print-like” experience, and how newspapers are evolving.

Above, you’ll see, from left to right, me; Michael Manning, Globe product manager; Lisa DeSisto, Globe chief advertising officer; Marty Baron, Globe editor; and Chris Mayer, Globe publisher. Enjoy.

POSTED     Sept. 28, 2011, 2 p.m.
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As the Christchurch massacre trial begins, New Zealand news orgs vow to keep white supremacist ideology out of their coverage
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