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Oct. 5, 2011, 9:30 p.m.

Steve Jobs: 1955-2011

Tributes from a president, a competitor, and — most importantly — Apple users.

We don’t have much decoration in the Nieman Lab office. One of the few pieces we have, though, is a framed picture of a famed quote: “Real artists ship.”

Steve Jobs had been sick for a long time, and today’s news shouldn’t come as a shock — but, still. “I never expected to be this affected,” Gizmodo’s Joe Brown put it. Jobs’ loss is a loss to technology that seems, also, intensely personal — ironic, maybe, for a man as private as Jobs, but fitting for a visionary who’s done more than anyone else to bring the words “personal” and “computer” together.

With that in mind, here are some of the thoughts shared, this evening, by the people whose worlds Jobs changed — thoughts shared, we’d bet, through devices he brought to fruition.

POSTED     Oct. 5, 2011, 9:30 p.m.
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