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Why do people avoid news? It’s not just because it makes them feel bad
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Aug. 29, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
Audience & Social

People are lining up on the street to get free copies of The New York Times’ 1619 Project

“The feeling on line was electric; ppl of all races shared their stories of trying to find this magazine.”

The New York Times’ 1619 Project magazine issue, which reframes American history in light of how it was and continues to be shaped by slavery, has turned out to be one of the must-read, must-discuss works of the summer; nearly two weeks after its publication, it’s still inspiring both rhapsodic praise and conservative backlash.

It’s also becoming a must-have physical item (display it on your coffee table! Just make sure you don’t spill coffee on it), kind of like how that New Yorker tote bag did two years ago. Copies of the August 18 issue are being offered for more than $100 on eBay. (The New York Times’ Nikole Hannah-Jones, the force behind the project, cautioned people to chill.)

On Thursday, between 10 AM and 2 PM or until supplies run out, the Times is handing out 2,000 free copies of the 1619 Project at its headquarters (40th St. and 8th Avenue) and…people are here for this.

Jones said that the Times is “working on” paid issues, for those who aren’t in Manhattan this morning, or who accidentally recycled their paper, or whatever. The Pulitzer Center also has a free PDF and lesson plans, and the package is, of course, all available on the Times’ website.

For now, I will continue to enjoy these line videos, which are *extremely heartwarming* at a time when we can use it.

Earl Wilson/The New York Times.

POSTED     Aug. 29, 2019, 9:30 a.m.
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