Nieman Foundation at Harvard
Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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July 3, 2013, 12:59 p.m.
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   July 3, 2013

That’s according to new Pew research.

Maybe more interesting: the use of the word “use.” You use Reddit.

Now listen to how strange the verb sounds when put in a news media context. Nine percent of Americans use The New York Times. Fourteen percent of Georgians use The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. (Those numbers are made up, by the way.)

There’s something about the platform-fueled intersection between consumption and utility. If news organizations could get their audiences to think of themselves as users rather than just readers/watchers, they’d probably see a commensurate rise in attachment, commitment, and, well, usage.

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Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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