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July 18, 2013, 2:57 p.m.
LINK: www.buzzfeed.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Caroline O'Donovan   |   July 18, 2013

buzzfeed-lolWe dove into BuzzFeed’s Community vertical a few weeks ago, focusing on how young aspirants to Internet fame can use it to achieve cash, glory, and maybe even a job. More recently, the page experienced some backlash when a user-generated post poking fun at the site was deleted and then reposted. (This one lives, though!)

For those whose interest has been piqued, a frequent user (who was quoted in our piece) shared some tips on how to become a big deal on BuzzFeed. The post is, of course, titled “10 BuzzFeed Hacks That Will Improve Your Community Posts.” It’s not a goofy post, though, and gets into the nitty gritty of tags, stickers, SEO, images, self-promotion, and even strategy-by-clock:

As the graphic below demonstrates, BuzzFeed draws its most traffic during the day between Monday and Friday. To capture your share, schedule posts accordingly. Because the editorial review process for Community posts can take up to 12 hours (sometimes longer on the weekend), I find it beneficial to post the night before (don’t forget about your Cat Power!). Along the same lines, prepping something on Sunday so it will be reviewed Monday morning can set you up for a prime placement at the beginning of the week.

On the flipside of this equation, the staff writers ease off a bit during the weekends, which presents opportunities of its own. Take this post, Pee-Wee Herman Cycling Suit, which I wrote in January on a Sunday afternoon. It was endorsed less than an hour later (not typical, mind you), trended onto the homepage in the early evening, and was perfectly positioned for visitors — and more importantly, other writers and editors — coming to the site the next morning looking for fresh posts.

Good luck!

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