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The New York Times is buying the gadget and technology review site The Wirecutter for $30 million
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Sept. 10, 2013, 2:57 p.m.
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   September 10, 2013

Normally, after an Apple keynote, I write a quick roundup of what was interesting about it from a working journalist’s or a media company’s perspective. This time, though, there isn’t much.

The new iPhone 5S looks really nice and promises a superstar camera that I’m sure will be useful on assignment. iOS 7, which was announced earlier this summer, will prompt some redesigns of iPhone and iPad news apps that have fallen fallow. iWork apps, iPhoto, and iMovie will now come free with the purchase of a new iOS device, which will mean some pretty nice editing tools for everyone.

But…not much else. No Newsstand announcements, no Apple TV API, no crazy smartwatch to test your responsive designs on…nothing. Here’s a link to all of The Verge’s coverage.

Update: Damon Kiesow points out that the new fingerprint scanner in the iPhone 5S will be able to replace typing in your Apple password for purchases, making ecommerce a hair’s breadth smoother. But I doubt that will lead to too many more drunken Popular Mechanics downloads at 3 a.m.

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