Nieman Foundation at Harvard
With its $250 election-night event, The New York Times is offering some of its readers a new kind of fix
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Sept. 10, 2013, 12:54 p.m.
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   September 10, 2013

Count The New York Daily News among the collection of news organizations that are trying their hand at being an incubator. The Daily News new Innovation Lab (everyone wants to be a lab!) will offer companies space and funding:

Applicants who are chosen to participate will be housed at The News’ headquarters in lower Manhattan. A slate of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and professionals will provide mentorship and guidance. The program’s professional partners will offer free legal, accounting and other services as well as six months of post-graduation office space. Participating companies will issue The News 5% of the common stock of their company. They can also choose to receive seed funding, up to $25,000, in the form of a convertible note.

At the end of the program, companies will have the opportunity to enter into a commercial agreement with The News.

The Daily News joins their Manhattan rivals The New York Times, as well as The Philadelphia Daily News, The Philadelphia Inquirer, and The Boston Globe as newspapers who have run incubator programs.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
With its $250 election-night event, The New York Times is offering some of its readers a new kind of fix
“Spend an exciting evening in the company of our top political minds at The Times Center as they deliver expert analysis and global perspectives on the outcome of this year’s presidential race — while returns are coming in.”
The Texas Tribune updates its premium political coverage for an email newsletter world
Goodbye, Texas Weekly. Hello, The Blast.
The Information’s Jessica Lessin on how she’s scaling an already-expensive subscription product
Going both upmarket to investors ($10,000 a year) and downmarket to students ($234 a year).