Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Indian journalists are on the frontline in the fight against election deepfakes
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Nov. 14, 2008, 10:38 a.m.

My future-of-journalism top 10

The people at blog vendor Six Apart asked me to make a list of the top 10 blogs about the future of journalism. In alphabetical order:

Adrian Monck, the head of a UK journalism school and a smart commentator, particularly on the more academic/philosophy-of-journalism side;

BuzzMachine, Ron Rosenbaum’s favorite blog;

Content Bridges, the blog of Ken Doctor, for my money the smartest analyst of the business side of the business;

Eat Sleep Publish, by Jason Preston, a smart advocate for new thinking and opponent of curmudgeons;

Journerdism, by Will Sullivan, the best aggregator of forward-looking links;

Mathew Ingram, a perceptive Canadian (and one always needs perceptive Canadians);

MediaShift, the Knight-funded and PBS-hosted mini-think-tank, admirably hosted by Mark Glaser;

The Nieman Journalism Lab, which must be a typo;

Notes from a Teacher, another perceptive Canadian, Mark Hamilton, another great aggregator;

Teaching Online Journalism, by Mindy McAdams, the preeminent evangelist for multimedia journalism.

Apologies to those who just missed the cut. (And yes, Friendly Blogger, you were No. 11.)

Joshua Benton is the senior writer and former director of Nieman Lab. You can reach him via email (joshua_benton@harvard.edu) or Twitter DM (@jbenton).
POSTED     Nov. 14, 2008, 10:38 a.m.
Show tags
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Indian journalists are on the frontline in the fight against election deepfakes
The ongoing general election is a pressure test for how to report on political voice clones and video spoofs.
Welcome to the neighborhood! How Documented brings NYC immigration news to Nextdoor’s Caribbean communities
“We are bringing onto this platform — where people usually talk about their lost cat or that they’re looking for an apartment — serious news content sparking a new kind of conversation.”
ProPublica’s new “50 states” commitment builds on a decade-plus of local news partnerships
With annual revenue of $45 million and a staff approaching 200 people, ProPublica has been one of the big journalism winners of the past decade. And it’s been unusually willing to spread that wealth around the country.