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Nov. 14, 2008, 10:38 a.m.

My future-of-journalism top 10

The people at blog vendor Six Apart asked me to make a list of the top 10 blogs about the future of journalism. In alphabetical order:

Adrian Monck, the head of a UK journalism school and a smart commentator, particularly on the more academic/philosophy-of-journalism side;

BuzzMachine, Ron Rosenbaum’s favorite blog;

Content Bridges, the blog of Ken Doctor, for my money the smartest analyst of the business side of the business;

Eat Sleep Publish, by Jason Preston, a smart advocate for new thinking and opponent of curmudgeons;

Journerdism, by Will Sullivan, the best aggregator of forward-looking links;

Mathew Ingram, a perceptive Canadian (and one always needs perceptive Canadians);

MediaShift, the Knight-funded and PBS-hosted mini-think-tank, admirably hosted by Mark Glaser;

The Nieman Journalism Lab, which must be a typo;

Notes from a Teacher, another perceptive Canadian, Mark Hamilton, another great aggregator;

Teaching Online Journalism, by Mindy McAdams, the preeminent evangelist for multimedia journalism.

Apologies to those who just missed the cut. (And yes, Friendly Blogger, you were No. 11.)

POSTED     Nov. 14, 2008, 10:38 a.m.
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