Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Facing “unprecedented demand,” The Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma expands (and adapts) its offerings
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Nov. 14, 2008, 10:38 a.m.

My future-of-journalism top 10

The people at blog vendor Six Apart asked me to make a list of the top 10 blogs about the future of journalism. In alphabetical order:

Adrian Monck, the head of a UK journalism school and a smart commentator, particularly on the more academic/philosophy-of-journalism side;

BuzzMachine, Ron Rosenbaum’s favorite blog;

Content Bridges, the blog of Ken Doctor, for my money the smartest analyst of the business side of the business;

Eat Sleep Publish, by Jason Preston, a smart advocate for new thinking and opponent of curmudgeons;

Journerdism, by Will Sullivan, the best aggregator of forward-looking links;

Mathew Ingram, a perceptive Canadian (and one always needs perceptive Canadians);

MediaShift, the Knight-funded and PBS-hosted mini-think-tank, admirably hosted by Mark Glaser;

The Nieman Journalism Lab, which must be a typo;

Notes from a Teacher, another perceptive Canadian, Mark Hamilton, another great aggregator;

Teaching Online Journalism, by Mindy McAdams, the preeminent evangelist for multimedia journalism.

Apologies to those who just missed the cut. (And yes, Friendly Blogger, you were No. 11.)

POSTED     Nov. 14, 2008, 10:38 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Facing “unprecedented demand,” The Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma expands (and adapts) its offerings
“We were changed by the practicalities of the pandemic. But we’re also changed by a radical shift of awareness in journalism of the challenges of covering these events, and the psychological costs to journalists of unremitting stress.”
Facebook is going to ask you more often what you want in your News Feed
“Is this post worth your time?” (Or is it at least a picture of people hugging?)
No, Americans haven’t abandoned journalism values like transparency and oversight
A study that seemed to claim they had was treated as “bad news for journalists: the public doesn’t share our values.” The reality is a few arbitrary research design decisions put a thumb on the scale.