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Postcards and laundromat visits: The Texas Tribune audience team experiments with IRL distribution
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Jan. 9, 2009, 10:27 a.m.

Morning Links: January 9, 2009

How and where Google makes its money. Notice the string of red “X”s next to Google News (and many other products) — it’s the unending wave of cash generated by its advertising business that allows Google to spend so much of its energies on products that don’t raise a nickel.

— If you were planning on buying Adrian Holovaty’s book to learn how to program in Django — the newspaper-derived framework for building web applications — don’t. Wait until the second edition.

— Eric Ulken looks at the New York Times’ data strategies. Interesting that they used Django for mapping on Represent; I was under the impression the Times was mostly a Rails shop, Rails being Django’s to-the-death rival in the framework space.

— Mark Luckie shares the conventional wisdom of eyetracking studies.

Joshua Benton is the senior writer and former director of Nieman Lab. You can reach him via email (joshua_benton@harvard.edu) or Twitter DM (@jbenton).
POSTED     Jan. 9, 2009, 10:27 a.m.
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