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The Atlantic’s layoffs may sound the death knell for two media revenue hopes: Video and in-person events
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May 25, 2009, 10:33 a.m.

Chris Brogan’s vision of a new media entity

Chris Brogan isn’t — and as far as I know has never been — a journalist. He’s a new-media marketing consultant and the founder of Podcamp (his bio is here). When I saw that he had written a blog post about what a “new media” company of the future might look like, I confess that I was expecting something with a focus primarily on marketing (perhaps that was unfair, but there it is). What Chris came up with, however, is very similar to what I see when I think about the future of the online media business — a business that takes advantage of what the online world allows, rather than treating it as an afterthought. Among other things, Chris says such an entity would realize that:

  • Stories are points in time [and] don’t end at publication.
  • Curators and editors rule, and creators aren’t necessarily on staff.
  • Media cannot stick to one form. Text, photos, video, music, audio, animation, etc.
  • Everything must be portable and mobile-ready.
  • Everything must have collaborative opportunities.
  • Advertising cannot be the primary method of revenue.

Be sure to read the whole thing. A good debate is already emerging in the comments.

POSTED     May 25, 2009, 10:33 a.m.
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