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Why won’t some people pay for news?
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Jan. 25, 2011, noon

Sign up for our weekly Nieman Journalism Lab email

I’m happy to note that, in only two months’ existence, we’ve had over 1,400 people in 68 countries sign up to our daily Lab email. (They join our 38,000-plus followers on Twitter, our roughly 8,000 RSS subscribers, 2,500 fans on Facebook, and the lonely 13 people who pay 99 cents a month for us on the Kindle.)

The daily email goes out at 3 p.m. Lab time, Monday through Friday, and sums up all our stories from the previous 24 hours. We’ve got some fun stuff planned for making that email even better.

But I also know that any daily email is a commitment — that our inboxes overfloweth, and that not everyone wants another +1 to their unread message count every afternoon. So we’ve added a once-a-week email to the list of ways you can keep up with what we’re up to here at the Lab.

The weekly email goes out every Friday and includes links to and excerpts from all the original material we’ve posted during the week. Step aside, Dan Brown and J.K. Rowling — we’ve found the new perfect weekend reading! You can sign up for either the daily or weekly email over on our Subscribe page.

POSTED     Jan. 25, 2011, noon
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