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March 17, 2011, 4:30 p.m.

The NYT’s pitch on its new paywall

The New York Times communications staff emailed out this slide deck to media writing about their new paywall plan. (And trust me, we’ve been writing about it.) The deck lays out the basics of the plan, but also gives an idea of the pitch is meant to read to advertisers and investors, not just readers.

Flip through the 22 slides for an overview of exactly how it’ll work, but I’ve also pulled out a few of the more interesting facts within:

— About 80 percent of the NYT’s top 100 print advertisers now also advertise on nytimes.com (slide 3).

— The Times’ iPad app has been downloaded 1.6 million times as of 10 days ago, versus 6.2 million downloads of its iPhone app (slide 4).

— No shame in namechecking your inspiration: “The Times is launching digital subscriptions using a model similar to the Financial Times” (slide 6).

— The print paper may have fewer subscribers than it used to, but they’re more loyal: “Core New York Times newspaper subscriptions of 2+ years are more than 800,000, up from 650,000 in 2000” (slide 13).

— Not like it’s news, but Times readers are rich! “New York Times readers are significantly more upscale than the U.S. adult population,” including their “expensive homes” (slide 13). And gotta love the headline on slide 14: “New York Times Readers: Engaged, Affluent, Female.”

POSTED     March 17, 2011, 4:30 p.m.
PART OF A SERIES     The New York Times’ new paywall
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