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What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
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Aug. 18, 2015, 3:30 p.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: twitter.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   August 18, 2015

You might not know it from the 90-degree weather, but fall is approaching, and that means it’s time to go back to school. On Monday evening, Emily Bell, a professor at the Columbia School of Journalism and director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, asked her Twitter followers for their best advice for new student journalists.

Bell is preparing a lecture on the changes in the journalism industry for the Columbia School of Journalism class of 2016, and many of the best responses to her tweet focused on that theme.

From Drake Martinet, VP of product at Vice Media:

From Andrea L. Guzman, who studies and writes about AI:

From Roy Greenslade, journalism professor and Guardian writer:

From Suzanne Moore, Guardian columnist::

From Jack Rosenberry, journalism professor:

From Amir Mizroch, Wall Street Journal tech editor:

From Kat Brown, Telegraph journalist:

From Rahul Chopra, Storyful CEO:

From Natalia Ciolko, Texas Tribune sales operations manager:

And from Matthew Hutching, a current journalism student:

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What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
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