Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
What do we want? Unbiased reporting! When do we want it? During protests!
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Nov. 24, 2015, 1:43 p.m.

Come talk ad blockers with Nieman Lab and a set of experts in New York

We’re having our first event in New York City with industry leaders: Wednesday, December 2 at 6 p.m.

We’ve all heard a lot of talk this year about ad blockers. While they’ve been around for years, Apple’s allowing them on iPhones and iPads this fall brought home a sad reality for many publishers: that a lot of their readers aren’t seeing the ads their business model depends on. At conferences and in media company corridors, news execs whisper about the numbers they’re seeing: 10, 20, even 30 percent of users are blocking.

We want to talk about it — and to have our first ever Nieman Lab event in New York City, where so many of these media companies are. So I hope you’ll join us next Wednesday, December 2 for a panel discussion on ad blocking and its impact on the news business — particularly on mobile devices. Register here — it’s free.

We’ve assembled a terrific panel: Hayley Romer (publisher of The Atlantic), Frédéric Montagnon (CEO of adblocker-blocker Secret Media), Jason Kint (CEO of trade group Digital Content Next), and David Carroll (associate professor of media design at the New School).

We’re gathering at NYU’s journalism building, at 20 Cooper Square in New York, on the 7th floor. We’ll start assembling at 6 p.m., with the panel starting at 6:30 p.m. Plenty of food and drink.

If you’d like to attend, we ask that you please let us know by grabbing a ticket. (Again, it’s free — we just want to keep track of how many people are coming.) Hope to see you there!

Photo of empty billboards by Ariel Dovas used under a Creative Commons license.

POSTED     Nov. 24, 2015, 1:43 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
What do we want? Unbiased reporting! When do we want it? During protests!
Not all protests get treated equally. Stories about women’s marches and anti-Trump protests give more voice to the protesters than those about Black Lives Matter and other anti-racism protests.
Instagram is busy fact-checking memes and rainbow hills while leaving political lies alone
Plus: Emphasizing a publisher’s name on social doesn’t seem to impact readers’ misinfo radar much one way or the other.
Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation
MediaReview wants to turn the mishmash vocabulary around manipulated photos and video into something structured.