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Don’t click this: When should news organizations use “nofollow” links?
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March 6, 2018, 2:07 p.m.
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LINK: www.nytimes.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   March 6, 2018

Look, it’s no New York Times’ first tweet, but what follows is the oral history of how The New York Times got shruggie into a headline.

I asked the story’s author, Jonah Bromwich, how this was able to happen.

For the record, Nieman Lab is a huge fan of this decision (I mean: this, this, this, not that shruggie is an emoji). The decision was criticized in meteorology circles. We’re still not sure how much snow we’re going to get.

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Don’t click this: When should news organizations use “nofollow” links?
Plus, a new free course for online fact-checking taught via workspace app Notion.
One potential route to flagging fake news at scale: Linguistic analysis
It’s not perfect, but legitimate and faked news articles use language differently in ways that can be detected algorithmically: “On average, fake news articles use more expressions that are common in hate speech, as well as words related to sex, death, and anxiety.”
Finally, Instagram is getting fact-checked (in a limited way and just in the U.S., for now)
“The potential to prevent harm is high here, particularly with the widespread existence of health misinformation on the platform.”