Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Journalists are burned out. Some newsrooms are fighting back.
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
March 6, 2018, 2:07 p.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: www.nytimes.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   March 6, 2018

Look, it’s no New York Times’ first tweet, but what follows is the oral history of how The New York Times got shruggie into a headline.

I asked the story’s author, Jonah Bromwich, how this was able to happen.

For the record, Nieman Lab is a huge fan of this decision (I mean: this, this, this, not that shruggie is an emoji). The decision was criticized in meteorology circles. We’re still not sure how much snow we’re going to get.

Show tags
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Journalists are burned out. Some newsrooms are fighting back.
Keeping reporters healthy over the long term often requires both systemic and behavioral changes, and getting buy-in often isn’t easy.
Disinformation often gets blamed for swaying elections, but the research isn’t so clear
“Our belief in free will is ultimately a reason so many of us back democracy in the first place. Denying it can arguably be more damaging than a few fake news posts lurking on social media.”
After LA Times layoffs, questions about diversity and seniority swirl
Disagreements between the LA Times and its Guild over seniority protections ended in more than 60 journalists of color being laid off.