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After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
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Aug. 2, 2018, 10:42 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: twitter.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   August 2, 2018

Should journalists go to journalism school? Does “J-school” mean majoring in journalism in college, or going to a graduate journalism program, or both? Maybe these questions shouldn’t be that confusing, but when Marlee Baldridge, Nieman Lab’s 2018 Google News Initiative Fellow, started working on a batch of stories about journalism school, we discovered that even within the Nieman Lab team there was disagreement on what J-school actually is. And four of us graduated from colleges that don’t offer journalism as a major. We were clearly not the experts on this. So we went to our readers with a (highly nonscientific) Twitter poll.

As of Thursday morning, nearly 1,000 people had voted and were roughly evenly split between majoring in journalism in undergrad (37 percent) and not attending any kind of J-school at all (39 percent). Fifteen percent of respondents attended a journalism graduate school program. The poll is still open.

We also asked readers to share their experiences, and many are below. One thing is clear: People are told all different kinds of things, but there’s no one right answer.

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