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Three years into nonprofit ownership, The Philadelphia Inquirer is still trying to chart its future
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May 20, 2019, 12:23 p.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: twitter.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Christine Schmidt   |   May 20, 2019

As resources (especially locally) in journalism recede, collaboration has emerged as a way to do more with more by sharing skills, networks, and other reporting tools for maximum impact. The third annual Collaborative Journalism Summit, organized by the Center for Cooperative Media at Montclair State University and hosted this year by WHYY in Philadelphia, is, well, a collaborative collaboration geek-out. (There may have been “Collaborate or die” stickers.)

A big theme this year was how collaboration can be wielded beyond newsrooms and communities where the overwhelming number of (white) journalists are comfortable engaging. When you are collaborating, who’s included and who’s left out?

The summit also serves as a gauge on the state of collaboration in the media industry, with this summary from the center’s director Stefanie Murray and others:

We’ve shared several case studies about collaboration among local, national, and regional outlets; here’s a sampling of projects mentioned (reported by us and others) at the summit:

  1. How the Broke in Philly collaboration is focusing local media’s attention on poverty and economic mobility
  2. How the BBC built one of the world’s largest collaborative journalism efforts focused entirely on local news
  3. With vast records of police misconduct now public, California news outlets are collaborating instead of competing
  4. How these Chicago news organizations worked together to create a collaborative voting guide

And here’s a compilation of some of the best thoughts shared at the summit, including a presentation on the BBC local news partnership, a panel on the co-op model of news ownership, Diana Montaño and Darryl Holliday’s presentations about infusing collaboration with equity and equipping others, and more (think of this as a mini-collaboration):

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