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Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)
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May 8, 2012, 9:38 a.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK: qz.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 8, 2012

And a more detailed pitch: The high points are all about the needs of a globally oriented, Emirates-riding uber class, a “new generation” of business people (and, humbly, of business sites).

The traditional press that chronicled — indeed, often cheered — the previous economic order struggles to understand this emerging global system. They are stuck with old explanations for new dynamics that include post-nationalism, openness, and a world in which remittances can be sent from one continent to another with nothing more than a mobile phone. The primacy of their loyalty to print constrains their ability to adapt to a fluid, mobile, digital, international marketplace for information…

These post-national business leaders are hungry for information that can help them better navigate the complex new global economy, optimizing their businesses and their lives. They’re looking for a worldview unconstrained by the Old World order. They need media native to all digital platforms and paced for around-the-clock mobile reading.

Former Nieman Labber Zach Seward is helping launch/run Quartz, we’re proud to say.

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