Nieman Foundation at Harvard
Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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June 11, 2012, 10:54 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK:  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   June 11, 2012

Interesting data from social media firm Rippla, comparing the social lives of stories from the major British news outlets. BBC stories produce 55.9 percent of the tweets generated in their news universe (which includes the major dailies and networks), far outdistancing The Guardian, The Telegraph, and Reuters.

But it’s a different story on Facebook, where the BBC (29.6 percent) finished behind The Daily Mail (35.8 percent), followed closely by The Guardian (23.3 percent, helped no doubt by its Facebook app). Another marker of how Twitter is the more performative social network of the two.

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Holding algorithms (and the people behind them) accountable is still tricky, but doable
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