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Brazil’s Nexo Jornal sticks to its founding principles: Explanatory journalism, subscribers, and no ads
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April 21, 2017, 10:16 a.m.
Audience & Social

Nieman Lab is looking for more stories of digital innovation outside the U.S., and we’d love your help

Have ideas for things we should cover? Want to help us cover them? Want to help us translate stories so that they reach more people? Join our new Slack community!

Last year, 44 percent of Nieman Lab’s web traffic came from outside the United States. More than half of our Twitter followers and 70 percent of those who like our Facebook page are based outside of the U.S. We do our best to cover journalism innovation around the world, but from our lovely office in Cambridge, it’s easy for us to focus too much on what’s happening here in America. And some of our most rewarding stories have been ones that tell people in one country about the interesting and provocative innovations happening in another.

We’ve gotten a small grant from the Open Society Foundations to expand our international coverage. To help us out, we hope you’ll consider joining a Slack community (sign up with the form at the bottom of this page) we’re starting to help us improve our international coverage.

We’re looking for tips and story ideas. Are you starting your own digital journalism project we should be aware of? Is your newsroom trying out something unusual, whether it’s a paywall innovation, a new distribution channel, or a smart way of moderating comments? Is your news outlet doing something particularly well, and we should check out how you’ve managed to do it (or was there a flopped experiment, that can serve as a good case study)? Is there a cross-country partnership on fact-checking that we’ve missed? Is there someone we should definitely do a Q&A with? Anything particular we’ve undercovered in the past? These are just rough suggestions — we’re open to lots of ideas.

We’re looking for freelancers. You know far better than we might what experiments are brewing in your country! Pitch us stories about non-U.S. digital media that you’d like to write, and that you think are a good fit for Nieman Lab (if you read our site regularly or subscribe to our newsletter, you should have a sense of what we focus on). Can you write fluently in more than one language? We’d love to hear from you even more.

We’re looking for translators. Do you work for a non-English-language publication that might want to translate and run our stories, either as a one-off or as part of a larger partnership? Can you help us translate what are sometimes pretty wonky pieces of media reporting? Please reach out.

If any of the above sounds like something you’d be interested in participating in, or you know someone who’d be interested in participating in, sign up for our Slack community. We’ll use that space to share ideas, ask for help with certain stories and translations, and chat about how else we can better cover media developments in markets other than our own.

Fill out the form below, hit submit, and then click the link to join our Slack:

POSTED     April 21, 2017, 10:16 a.m.
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