Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Lots of visible likes and shares on social lead people to spread more misinformation
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Aug. 18, 2009, 8:30 a.m.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel signs with Journalism Online

Journalism Online, the high-profile, if vaguely named, startup with a plan to charge for news on the Internet, says it has signed with media companies representing 176 daily newspapers. But it won’t say which ones.

On Thursday, PaidContent’s Staci Kramer reported she has “good reason to believe” that one of the companies is her corporate parent, Guardian News and Media, which publishes The Guardian and The Observer in London. To that list, I can now add Journal Communications, publisher of The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, which claims just under a million monthly visitors to its website.

I called up the Journal Sentinel on a tip, and Sharon Prill, senior vice president for interactive media, confirmed that they had signed a letter of intent with Journalism Online. “I think like any other publishing entity, we’re exploring paid models,” she told me. The Journal Sentinel has experience charging for news: Some of their Green Bay Packers coverage is behind a pay wall for $7 a month or $45 a year. Asked if the program, dubbed Packer Insider, has been successful, Prill said, “Successful, in that it generates a profit, yes. But in terms of growing that subscription base, it’s been challenging like everything else.”

Signing with Journalism Online doesn’t necessarily mean the Journal Sentinel will decide to charge for more of its website. “We’re in the due diligence stage,” Prill said. For now, it means they’ll receive consulting assistance and perhaps better technology for charging readers if they decide to go that route. And while every market is different, you can get a sense for the pitch they’re likely hearing in Milwaukee from the posts I wrote about Journalism Online in June. Steve Brill, a co-founder of the firm, argued that newspapers could aim to extract payment from at least 5 percent of their monthly online visitors, which would be 46,550 people for the Journal Sentinel.

Meanwhile, don’t expect Guardian News and Media to be raising any pay walls. Emily Bell, the company’s director of digital content, recently made her position on them clear: “They are a stupid idea in that they restrict audiences for largely replicable content.” The Guardian is instead considering a paid members’ club that could include exclusive events and other offers, and that could be why Journalism Online is involved.

Who else is among the firm’s early clientele? Not Dow Jones, McClatchy, or Tribune, which all said they weren’t on board last week. If you know of other companies that have signed with Journalism Online, feel free to drop me a line.

POSTED     Aug. 18, 2009, 8:30 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Lots of visible likes and shares on social lead people to spread more misinformation
When people saw that a questionable piece of content had been liked and shared lots of times, they were more likely to share it themselves
How much does fake coronavirus news affect people’s real-life health behavior?
And what about Trump’s hydroxychloroquine and bleach proclamations?
An open letter to the new CEO of The New York Times
Meredith Kopit Levien, everyone seems to agree, is the right person to lead the Times into the 2020s. But here’s hoping she’ll view her mission more broadly — including the state of local news in America.