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Dec. 17, 2010, 2 p.m.

Bill Keller on how WikiLeaks has evolved, the NYT reporting process, and threats to national security

Bill Keller’s keynote speech at the Secrecy and Journalism in the New Media Age conference garnered a lot of attention Thursday after the New York Times executive editor made a notable distinction between himself and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange: I don’t regard Julian Assange as a kindred spirit. If he’s a journalist, he’s not the kind of journalist that I am.

Keller’s talk was a broad discussion of the Times’ handling of WikiLeaks documents, from parsing files in the computer-assisted reporting unit to conversations with lawyers and officials in the U.S. government. But Keller also took time to address some of the criticisms of the Times’ working with WikiLeaks. On Thursday, our Michael Morisy summarized Keller’s speech for the Lab, and here is the full video which includes the Q&A. We’ve also included the archived liveblog of the talk with commentary from Twitter.

POSTED     Dec. 17, 2010, 2 p.m.
PART OF A SERIES     Secrecy and Journalism
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