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The Boston Globe revisits an infamous murder — and confronts its own sins along the way
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Dec. 14, 2011, 9:31 a.m.
LINK: www.ap.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   December 14, 2011

A new deal with WhoSay means that the service’s celebrity users — Charlie Sheen, Jeremy Piven, and Holly Madison among them — can now have their twitpics licensed through AP Images. Also:

Separate from the commercial photo agreement, AP and WhoSay have agreed to allow AP journalists to use the WhoSay platform to post their self-shot photos and videos on their pages and distribute them onto social networks. The AP is starting with 20 journalists and may expand to include others.

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