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Evoking empathy or seeking solidarity: Which is preferable when covering people without homes?
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Jan. 9, 2012, 9:29 a.m.
LINK: www.nytimes.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   January 9, 2012

Brian Stelter has a smart piece in today’s Times (pegged to the debut of the new CBS morning show) on how the three major evening broadcasts in the United States no longer march in lockstep:

On any given night, one might lead with the Republican campaign, another with extreme weather and the third with an exclusive interview.

“The three evening newscasts have become more different from one another than at any time I can remember,” said Bill Wheatley, who worked at NBC News for 30 years and now teaches at Columbia. [And is outgoing president of the Nieman advisory board. —Ed.]

The differences provide a stark illustration of the state of the news media — much more fragmented than ever, but also arguably more creative.

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