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What’s with the rise of “fact-based journalism”?
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March 19, 2012, 9:50 a.m.
LINK: stateofthemedia.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   March 19, 2012

You’ve already seen our take, but here’s what some other folks are highlighting in today’s big State of the Media 2012 report:

Brian Stelter in the Times: “Pew predicts that more news organizations will introduce flexible digital subscriptions in 2012, following the lead of The New York Times and others.”

Peter Kafka at All Things D: “If you’re like me, you increasingly rely on Twitter and Facebook as your news editors. But that means we’re in a small minority. Just 9 percent of American adults frequently get their news from their pals at the two services. And those who do end up getting it much more frequently from Facebook than Twitter.”

Jeff Sonderman at Poynter: “Facebook and Twitter users get news through different filters, though. ‘Facebook users follow news links shared by family and friends; Twitter users follow links from a range of sources,’ the report summarizes.”

Staci D. Kramer at paidContent: “Twitter users surveyed for Pew tended to be ‘less white’ than Facebook users or the general population, also more male and more educated. Facebook users are more likely to have children in the house. Both tend to be younger: more than one-third are 18 to 29.”

Emma Bazilian at Adweek: “Digital news sites saw the biggest increase (17.2 percent) in monthly audiences, followed by slight rises in network TV news audiences (up 4.5 percent), while local TV, radio, and cable TV news all rose 1 percent. Magazines lost less than 1 percent of their monthly audiences, while newspapers saw the largest decline at 4 percent.”

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