Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Here’s what ProPublica learned about managing a collaboration across hundreds of news organizations
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 30, 2012, 2:34 p.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK: allthingsd.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 30, 2012

This chart — from Mary Meeker’s much anticipated annual slide deck of Internet trend data, debuting today at D10 — is a prime example of the future being already here, just unevenly distributed. In this case, the future is the coming dominance of mobile as a path to the Internet, and the lumpy distribution favors India.

This month, for the first time, the majority of Internet traffic in that country will come from mobile devices, not desktops and laptops. India’s ahead of the curve — globally, mobile’s only about 10 percent of traffic — but anyone with access to web analytics can tell you trends lines are all moving in one direction.

Much scarier for traditional print media companies is this chart, showing the disconnect between U.S. consumer time spent and ad money spent, by medium. Print takes up 7 percent of our time but 25 percent of ad budgets; mobile devices take up 10 percent of our time but only 1 percent of ad budgets. That’s an imbalance that won’t continue forever.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Here’s what ProPublica learned about managing a collaboration across hundreds of news organizations
“Since the project began in 2017, we received more than 6,000 submissions, gathered hundreds of public records on hate crimes, and published more than 230 stories.”
People who are given correct information still misremember it to fit their own beliefs
Plus: “There is no bygone era of a well-informed, attentive public. What we have had in lieu of a well-informed citizenry is what might be termed a ‘load-bearing’ myth — the myth of the attentive public.”
This is how Report for America ended up funding a community Wikipedia editor (!) at a library (!!)
“Do something different and do it together.”