Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Apple wants you (and it) to get paid for your premium podcasts
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 15, 2012, 1:39 p.m.
Reporting & Production

Richard Sandomir at the Times has word of ESPN’s expansion of the 30 for 30 series of sports documentaries it launched in 2009. That’s great, but most interesting to me was this bit:

As the films roll out, they will be augmented on Grantland by podcasts, feature stories and oral histories. A short digital film — which will be unrelated to the longer ones — will make its debut each month on Grantland.

Mr. Schell described the shorts as “visual editorials,” of five to nine minutes. “They’re meant to be interesting conversations with people who have a point of view about something or sports stories that don’t require a four-act treatment,” he said.

Those “visual editorials” remind me a lot of The New York Times’ Op-Docs, which we wrote about in March.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Apple wants you (and it) to get paid for your premium podcasts
There’ll now be a dead-easy way to pay for a podcast on your iPhone. Will there be a market, and is this the end of the open podcasting ecosystem?
Why do people still get print newspapers? Well, partly to start up the grill (seriously)
“Appropriating the newspaper is tied to non-news practices which are meaningful to the actors, although they might seem trivial to some scholars.”
Being skeptical of sources is a journalist’s job — but it doesn’t always happen when those sources are the police
As a scholar who researches media coverage of police and protests, I believe Toledo’s death exposes a blind spot in journalism: a tendency to go with the “police said” narrative without outwardly questioning if it is right.