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The election could be contested and last for weeks after Nov. 3. Here’s what experts think journalists should know.
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May 10, 2012, 10:23 a.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: www.knightfoundation.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   May 10, 2012

The two foundations, already partners, are giving the money to Amara:

Amara (formerly Universal Subtitles), has transformed video subtitle creation and management, which was previously an expensive and complicated process. Just as organizations like Mozilla, Twitter, and Facebook have built volunteer communities to translate their websites, Amara makes this possible for companies to do with their video assets. Through Amara, it is possible for any individual or organization to enlist a team of experienced volunteers to translate a video and make it global. While Amara’s tools are free and open source, it also offers premium services, which companies and organizations can use to create and manage high quality subtitles, using staff, contractors and volunteers.

Amara is already being used by PBS NewsHour, among others. (Check out that link’s video in Turkish.)

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The election could be contested and last for weeks after Nov. 3. Here’s what experts think journalists should know.
“Newsrooms need to prepare for a political environment in which mainstream political figures, most notably the President of the United States, are going to promote false and unsupported claims about the election. They need to prepare for that now.”
Fox News uses the word “hate” much, much more often than MSNBC or CNN
“Fox’s use of ‘hate’ really took off when Trump’s presidency began. Beginning in January 2017, the mean usage of ‘they hate’ on the network doubled.”
A new set of threats to the BBC — internal and external — challenges its role as anchor of U.K. media
The BBC functions as a heat sink for polarization — converting potentially dangerous energy into something the system can more easily deal with. A new group of broadcast competitors and its likely new set of bosses see it differently.