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True Genius: How to go from “the future of journalism” to a fire sale in a few short years
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Aug. 29, 2012, 10:08 a.m.

You have until Sept. 10 to submit your idea — distilled down to nine to twelve sentences, three bullet points, and some contact info — and have a chance at Knight Foundation innovation cash. The first two News Challenges this year were all about networks and data; this time it’s mobile, a subject that’s been sneaking into other winners even when it isn’t the topic. Submissions go here. What’s Knight looking for?

Tools and approaches that use mobile to inform people and communities. This might include new mobile applications, tools to help journalists or others leverage mobile, platforms to empower mobile users, and so on. We’re interested in a broad range of topics, so if you’re unsure if your idea fits, we encourage you to go ahead and apply.

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True Genius: How to go from “the future of journalism” to a fire sale in a few short years
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