Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Oct. 11, 2012, 12:23 p.m.

Eleven percent of people who watched the presidential debate live last week were “dual screeners,” tracking the action both on TV and on a mobile device. That’s according to new research by the Pew Research Center for People & the Press.

Among viewers younger than 40, one in 10 said they ditched TV altogether and watched only on a computer or mobile device. From the report:

Overall, 32% of those younger than 40 say they followed the debate live online, including 22% who followed it both on television and online, and 10% who followed exclusively on a computer or mobile device. Those 40-to-64 are less likely to have followed live online (11%); just 1% followed only online, while 10% followed online as well as on television. Very few Americans 65 and older followed the debate live online (2%) and none followed live coverage exclusively on a computer or mobile device.

Only a tiny share of Americans who watched the debate reported reacting on platforms like Twitter and Facebook — about five percent of the overall debate audience, according to Pew.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
Plus: All misinformation is local; a very specific kind of Covid-19 misinformation in Facebook parent groups; and “religious clickbait.”
In the arena: Ken Doctor is moving from “media analyst” to “media CEO” with Lookout, his plan for quality local news
Lookout doesn’t want its local news sites to be a supplement or alternative to the local daily. They aim to be the news source of record in their communities, outgunning their shrunken newsprint rivals from Day 1.
People who engage with false news are hyper-concerned about truth. But they think it’s being hidden.
“On Google, searching for ‘coronavirus facts’ gives you a full overview of official statistics and visualizations. That’s not the case for ‘coronavirus truth.'”