Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Axios launches a premium subscription product aimed at the “dealmakers” among us
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Oct. 11, 2012, 12:23 p.m.

Eleven percent of people who watched the presidential debate live last week were “dual screeners,” tracking the action both on TV and on a mobile device. That’s according to new research by the Pew Research Center for People & the Press.

Among viewers younger than 40, one in 10 said they ditched TV altogether and watched only on a computer or mobile device. From the report:

Overall, 32% of those younger than 40 say they followed the debate live online, including 22% who followed it both on television and online, and 10% who followed exclusively on a computer or mobile device. Those 40-to-64 are less likely to have followed live online (11%); just 1% followed only online, while 10% followed online as well as on television. Very few Americans 65 and older followed the debate live online (2%) and none followed live coverage exclusively on a computer or mobile device.

Only a tiny share of Americans who watched the debate reported reacting on platforms like Twitter and Facebook — about five percent of the overall debate audience, according to Pew.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Axios launches a premium subscription product aimed at the “dealmakers” among us
After a two-week free trial, Axios Pro costs $600/year for one newsletter or $1,800/year for all Pro newsletters. (There’s no monthly option.)
A new report shows the impact of racial justice protests in 2020 on three local newspapers
A study of crime reporting in three major U.S. dailies found coverage included less dehumanizing language by the end of the year.
Does having stronger local newspapers make people more likely to follow COVID safety guidelines? Er, not so much
A new study finds that the more local newspapers there were in a county, the worse it performed on a measure of social distancing in the early days of the pandemic. But take the findings with a grain of salt.