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Jan. 24, 2013, 1:23 p.m.
LINK: adage.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   January 24, 2013

Ad Age has the latest leaked Nick Denton memo, which has its usual assortment of interesting nuggets, but one headline is the growth of e-commerce in Gawker’s revenue mix — “expected to produce at least 10% of revenues this year,” he writes. Jason Del Rey notes the language used in a recent Gawker Media job posting regarding “commerce content”:

It’s a brand new thing that merges writing and product curation. Most importantly, it adds value to our readers’ lives. So commerce content includes everything from posts about the cheapest deal on something our readers need to introducing them to new things they’ve never seen. It’s a new type of service journalism. And yes, we generate revenue when products sell.

Also of note: “The company is working on ways to show past posts that have generated high revenue through affiliate links to readers who haven’t yet seen them, Mr. Denton said.”

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