Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Way back in 1989, USA Today launched an online sports service. I found it at Goodwill
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
March 11, 2013, 5:05 p.m.
LINK: www.guardian.co.uk  ➚   |   Posted by: Caroline O'Donovan   |   March 11, 2013

In an interview about his new book, To Save Everything, Click Here, Evgeny Morozov talks about the potential for devaluing citizenship, the danger of ceding regulatory responsibility to Google, and, of course, the future of newspapers:

It depends on what the newspapers hold for the future. A lot of newspapers have embraced the digital rhetoric too eagerly, and have not articulated their own value to the public. A lot of what we hear from internet pundits is that everyone should be building their own reading lists, everyone should be on the lookout for interesting stories themselves, I think that logic is very regressive, backward, anti-democratic and stupid.

I’m fine with a staff of 300 people reading 5,000 stories everyday and condensing them into 25 pages that I myself can read. That’s a wonderful model. The newspaper offers something very different from Google’s aggregators. It offers a value system, an idea of what matters in the world. Newspapers need to start articulating that value.

Show tags
 
Join the 60,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Way back in 1989, USA Today launched an online sports service. I found it at Goodwill
USA Today Sports Center is a time capsule from a period in which a newspaper could convince people to pay five bucks an hour to log onto their service during the big game.
Pageviews, assemble! Why there’s no escaping the Marvel Cinematic Universe online
In 2022, few pop-culture brands move the needle, so newspaper blue-bloods and recipe sites alike rally around Marvel Cinematic Universe content as their last stand.
Researchers ask: Does enforcing civility stifle online debate?
Some social scientists argue that civility is a poor metric by which to judge the quality of an online debate.