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Being skeptical of sources is a journalist’s job — but it doesn’t always happen when those sources are the police
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March 20, 2013, 11:36 a.m.
LINK: www.slate.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   March 20, 2013

Slate’s Matthew Yglesias says Pew’s 2013 State of the Media report, while chronicling the declines in the media, neglects to see the positive aspects of the changes to the industry:

This viewpoint is not wrong, exactly, but it is mistaken. It’s a blinkered outlook that confuses the interests of producers with those of consumers, confuses inputs with outputs, and neglects the single most important driver of human welfare — productivity. Just as a tiny number of farmers now produce an agricultural bounty that would have amazed our ancestors, today’s readers have access to far more high-quality coverage than they have time to read.

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Being skeptical of sources is a journalist’s job — but it doesn’t always happen when those sources are the police
As a scholar who researches media coverage of police and protests, I believe Toledo’s death exposes a blind spot in journalism: a tendency to go with the “police said” narrative without outwardly questioning if it is right.
Block Club Chicago offered two versions of the same breaking news story — with and without a horrifying video
Readers told the nonprofit local newsroom that they appreciated the option to read an article omitting graphic video and images of 13-year-old Adam Toledo’s death.
Substack will spend $1 million to support “up to 30” local news writers
“This is not a grants program, nor is it inspired by philanthropic intent.”