Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
What do we want? Unbiased reporting! When do we want it? During protests!
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
April 25, 2013, 1:49 p.m.

Today at Source, NYT interactives assistant editor Jacqui Maher explains how the Times built its 2012 Olympics coverage. She discusses the workflow used for breaking down rapidly updating and diverse data about the competitions and how their approach has changed over the last few Olympic events.

Working on three consecutive Olympics for the Times has given me ample opportunity to consider how to approach a massively complex data project. I’ve walked you through the major issues produced by the sheer volume of data and the speed with which we needed to make it usable, how we thought through those issues to find solutions, what worked consistently, and what we’ve had to adapt along the way. The lessons I’ve learned are ones I’ll take with me on any project, Olympic or not. Be flexible and open to changing gears, but also be open to keeping battle-proven solutions around. Don’t dismiss older technology solutions—like saving to a filesystem—out of hand. Get out of your comfort zone, though, and don’t be afraid to try something new.

And if that didn’t sate your thirst for knowledge, here’s a presentation given by Cindy Royal from Texas State University at the International Symposium for Online Journalists on the same topic.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
What do we want? Unbiased reporting! When do we want it? During protests!
Not all protests get treated equally. Stories about women’s marches and anti-Trump protests give more voice to the protesters than those about Black Lives Matter and other anti-racism protests.
Instagram is busy fact-checking memes and rainbow hills while leaving political lies alone
Plus: Emphasizing a publisher’s name on social doesn’t seem to impact readers’ misinfo radar much one way or the other.
Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation
MediaReview wants to turn the mishmash vocabulary around manipulated photos and video into something structured.