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April 30, 2013, 2:11 p.m.
LINK: blog.nola.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   April 30, 2013

Advance’s bold bet on cutting print days at New Orleans’ Times-Picayune just became…a little less bold. And maybe a little more confused? It’s creating new print products for the days of the week when it had previously stopped printing the Picayune. Here’s the new plan:

Monday – TPStreet, only for street sale. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition.

Tuesday – TPStreet, only for street sale. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition.

Wednesday – The Times-Picayune, home delivered and for street sale, containing the full lineup of news, sports, editorial pages and entertainment features. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition.

Thursday – TPStreet, only for street sale. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition.

Friday – The Times-Picayune, home delivered and for street sale, containing full lineup of news, editorials, entertainment features and sports, plus Lagniappe and Inside/Out. 75 cents. Available to subscribers in e-edition.

Saturday – Early Edition of the Sunday Times-Picayune, with Sunday features, distinct breaking news and sports content, advertising inserts and coupons. Only for street sale. $2. Available to subscribers in e-edition.

Sunday – The Times-Picayune. Full Sunday package and special Sunday-only news features, as well as full lineup of news and entertainment features, expanded sports and editorials, advertising inserts and coupons. Home delivered and for street sale. $2. Available to subscribers in e-edition.

Clear as the Mississippi River under the Crescent City Connection. Which is to say, not particularly clear.

As nutty as this seems, it’s similar to what the two Detroit papers have been doing for several years and what the Picayune’s sister paper in Cleveland recently announced.

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